Ten years ago I died. Today, I live.

Okay, a freaking cute dog video.

the best dog ever. he couldve kept that lamp on that chippendale table but not her

Skutch – it means something like “Little Shit” in NY Italian slang

(P.S. At the end is the vlogbrothers Willy intro vid which is pretty vlogbrothers-like in awesome geekiness.)

nerdfighters.com

This is, objectively, the best thing of all time on YouTube. (And yes, I’m completely biased because I had a stupid little shit Westie and they are freaks with sound. They are said to “vocalize” more than any breed, and that doesn’t mean annoyingly yipping; they noises they make are so varied and broad and fun. And they also turn their heads in a million ways when they hear noises).

This little dog – from this very old vlogbrothers video – doesn’t have the odd little ear frizz that will always grow on a Westie’s ears – no matter how well you keep them groomed – that end up sticking up like antennae, but nonetheless, “Willy” shows all the reasons why I have never gotten another dog.

The way they turn their head at every sound is so expressive. And they will never stop doing it. It’s like their head is a tuning fork that must turn a different angle for every different sound, and it’s irresistible.

(They’re also wicked smart. Wicked smart, wicked cute, and they are ratters. So they are very much dog, but also very cat-like in some ways. They are, to me, the best mix of both.)

I don’t know if you’re dead or alive, Skutch, but you were the biggest, best dork dog I ever had to put up with. I loved every minute of it.

In case you can’t be bothered with “whole thing” –

“He just almost did the Exorcist thing, for God’s sake! I thought his head was going to spin around his neck!”

The whole thing:

This is Willy’s awesome introduction – very vlogbrothers funniesh.

tear down the wall

” –where we came in?”

I wanna go home. Take off this uniform and leave the show. I'm waiting in this cell because I have to know -

 

My conviction is that I have suffered for things that  I am guilty of.

I am suffering because I am a radical 

and indeed I am a radical;

I have suffered because  I was an Italian,

and indeed I am an Italian. 

      —Bartolomeo Vanzetti, 1927

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“Good morning, Worm, your honor–” 

“– this where we came in?”

 

Florida appears to actually have gotten something RIGHT

I am admittedly always a bit terrified when I get any legal updates on any law having anything to do with Florida.

Especially when the first sentence of that legal update leads with the words 

“…a Florida law adopted by citizen initiative

          Like most  people who care about human rights, my mind goes here:

But amazingly enough, this particular update was not only not negative, in my opinion, it’s quite the opposite:

Charles. v. Southern Baptist Hospital of Florida, Inc.

Court: Florida Supreme Court Docket: SC15-2180 Opinion Date: January 31, 2017
Areas of Law: Health Law, Medical Malpractice, Personal Injury

Florida Constitution Article X, section 25 (Amendment 7), adopted by citizen initiative in 2004, provides patients “a right to have access to any records made or received in the course of business by a health care facility or provider relating to any adverse medical incident.” “Adverse medical incident” includes “any other act, neglect, or default of a health care facility or health care provider that caused or could have caused injury to or death of a patient.” Amendment 7 gives medical malpractice plaintiffs access to any adverse medical incident record, including incidents involving other patients [occurrence reports], created by health care providers. The Federal Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act, however, creates a voluntary, confidential, non-punitive system of data sharing of health care errors for the purpose of improving medical care and patient safety, 42 U.S.C. 299b-21(6), and establishes a protected legal environment in which providers can share data “both within and across state lines, without the threat that the information will be used against [them].” The Supreme Court of Florida reversed a holding that Amendment 7 was preempted. The Federal Act was never intended as a shield to the production of documents required by Amendment 7. The health care provider or facility cannot shield documents not privileged under state law by virtue of its unilateral decision of where to place the documents under the federal voluntary reporting system.