More proof that WE ARE ALL SCREWED: Fox News makes sense

welcome to our communal nightmare

Take it away, Shep –

 

descensus in cuniculi cavum

 

caterpillar gif

When logic and proportion
Have fallen sloppy dead
And the White Knight is talking backwards
And the Red Queen’s off with her head
Remember what the dormouse said-

 

Starts as an excellent lecture on McClellan and Lee by Dr. Rafuse & quickly veers into “Give ‘Em Hell, Harry!”

A really excellent talk on by Ethan S. Rafuse on McClellan and Lee, and the gentlemanly/outdated West Point notions they brought to the Civil War. (Which, by the way, didn’t hamper Robert E. Lee from fighting in the way it did McClellan.)

As a University of Missouri alumnus – where I was born – as well as serving as Park Ranger at the Harry S. Truman National Memorial Site, I like his nod to technology at the beginning of his talk. My father would most definitely approve.

“The Civil War –“

(“Looks like we got an issue with the Clicker, here.”)

(“Alright…”)

“Either Duct tape it or slam it into something. One of those two will make it work.”

This sets up perfectly a lecture titled: “We always understood each other so well.”


[GEHH aside]

And also makes me take a little curve into the virtuoso performance of James Whitmore in Samuel Gallo’s

“Give ‘Em Hell, Harry!”

which, of course, my Dad filmed just in time for the 1976 elections and then unveiled in “Whistle Stop Campaign” fashion. While not an exacting historical record, it gets wholly deserved recognition for bringing focus back onto Truman’s legacy.

[snip]

“…’Well, Congressman, while I am most grateful of your concern for me and your possible influence with the Almighty, from what I know of the man, He’s got a helluva lot more important things to do –”

“And sign that, ‘God’s humble servant, Harry S. Truman.’

 

give em hell harry - .. --and sign that-----

” …and sign that God’s Humble Servant –“

 

 

“You wanna cut ‘helluva lot?’

“Fine, Rose, cut it out — 

 

give em hell harry ..--.. fine rose cut it out

” –doesn’t matter, cut it out, if it makes it easier for you –“

 

“Doesn’t matter. If it makes it easier, cut it out.”

“Alright. Now the next one is going to Senator Bishop of Colorado —

give em hell harry -_...and sign that ..god.s humble servant harry s truman...__

 

‘Dear Senator,

not only would I not appoint John L. Lewis, Ambassador to the Soviet Union — 

 

 

give em hell harry - .. --and sign that-----

“I wouldn’t appoint the old bastard dogcatcher.”

 

“Don’t you want to cut ‘old bastard,’ Rose?”

“Oh, you don’t?”

[end GEHH aside]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vicksburg – well, first, Grant more broadly – (and an amusing time-traveling sidetrack to Gettysburg)

unconditional surrender grant clipped

Grant at Ft. Donelson

So I really want to concentrate on Vicksburg but because Vicksburg was really about long, difficult, and seemingly endless preparation and because in that situation the purely personal relationships are key – and because Steve Knott’s Army War College lecture is so good – I’m going to put it up first so that at least I will have it close by to liven up my swamp digging siege stuff.

Let Steve Knot tell you why Confederate Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart ended up in Carlisle while the rest of the Confederates were converging on Gettysburg. Then we’ll head back to the long slog at Vicksburg.

Actually, you know what, before the terrain heavy, tactical, and brilliant siege Grant laid to Vicksburg, I think, because this is my own damn blog and I can put up any damn thing I want, it is my pleasure to just roll around in the amazingness of Grant in general and this, in my humble opinion, is one of the best takes on him that exists.

The Generalship of Ulysses S. Grant and the American Civil War

by

Dr. Richard J. Sommers

at the

U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center

From the YouTube description:

Ulysses S. Grant was neither a magnetic leader of Soldiers (such as George McClellan or George Patton) nor a military genius (in the mold of Robert E. Lee or Douglas MacArthur). Yet his qualities of command mark him as the best general in the Federal Army and one of the most successful generals in all of American history. Most significantly, he understood how to convert advantages into achievements. Our February program analyzes the generalship of Ulysses S. Grant, identifies his many strengths as a military commander, and yet also acknowledges limitations in his leadership. The presentation proceeds to place his generalship in the overall context of the American Civil War.